IF THE CREEK DON’T RISE

Leah Weiss

Indie Next Pick
Okra Pick

Sadie Blue has been a wife for fifteen days. That’s long enough to know she should have never hitched herself to Roy Tupkin, even with the baby.

Sadie is desperate to make her own mark on the world, but in remote Appalachia, a ticket out of town is hard to come by, and hope often gets stomped out.  When a stranger sweeps into Baines Creek and knocks things off kilter, Sadie finds herself with an unexpected lifeline…if she can just figure out how to use it.

more …

Indie Next Pick
Okra Pick

Sadie Blue has been a wife for fifteen days. That’s long enough to know she should have never hitched herself to Roy Tupkin, even with the baby.

Sadie is desperate to make her own mark on the world, but in remote Appalachia, a ticket out of town is hard to come by, and hope often gets stomped out.  When a stranger sweeps into Baines Creek and knocks things off kilter, Sadie finds herself with an unexpected lifeline…if she can just figure out how to use it.

This intimate insight into a fiercely proud, tenacious community unfolds through the voices of the forgotten folks of Baines Creek. With a colorful cast of characters that each contribute a new perspective, If The Creek Don’t Rise is a debut novel bursting with heart, honesty, and homegrown grit.

less …
  • Sourcebooks Landmark
  • Paperback
  • August 2017
  • 320 Pages
  • 9781492647454

Buy the Book

$15.99

indies Bookstore indies Bookstore

About Leah Weiss

Leah Weiss is a Southern writer and novelist born in North Carolina and raised in the foothills of Virginia. Her debut novel, If the Creek Don’t Rise, will be released in August of 2017. Her short stories have been published in The Simple Life magazine, Every Day Fiction, and Deep South Magazine. She retired in 2015 from a 24-year career as Executive Assistant to the Headmaster at Virginia Episcopal School. She now pursues writing full time.

Praise

“This one nearly broke my heart. An impressive debut from a talent to watch. ”Kathleen Grissom, author of the New York Times bestsellers The Kitchen House and Glory Over Everything

“Masterful use of language….for fans of the Big Stone Gap books, by Adriana Trigiani, and Mitford series, by Jan Karon.”Booklist, Starred Review

Discussion Questions

1. Life in 1970 Appalachia (and fictional Baines Creek) was undeniably hard and harsh. What did the novel tell you about that historic time and place that you expected? What did you learn that surprised you?

2. Sadie Blue was the principal character in the book, with her story told in three chapters. Did you root for her from the start? What were her key moments of growth? Who were her mentors and supporters? What did they do that helped her grow a stronger backbone?

3. In what ways were Sadie Blue and her grandmother, Gladys Hicks, and Sadie and her mother, Carly, alike? In what ways were they different?

4. Gladys and Marris were best friends. Who needed the other the most? Who gave the greatest purpose to their relationship?

5. Who were the most lovable or admirable characters? What made them that way? What were their strengths and weaknesses? In what ways were they important to Sadie’s salvation?

6. Preacher Eli Perkins never quite believed he was good enough for his job. How did that quality make you feel about him? How do you think he performed his job?

7. Three characters that are hard to love are Prudence Perkins, Roy Tupkin, and Billy Barnhill. Did you find any reasons to empathize with them? What were the pivotal moments in their past that shaped their personalities? How do you think you would have fared if you were born into their families and stations of life?

8. When Kate Shaw arrived in Baines Creek, she expected to be doing the teaching. What were the things she learned instead?

9. Birdie’s Books of Truths: What insights did they give you into life in Appalachia and the gifts Birdie possessed?

10. Which characters were most capable of loving? In what ways did they demonstrate that?

11. A number of murders were committed in the book. Do you think any of them were justified? If so, which ones and why?