DRAGON HOUSE

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John Shors

From the critically acclaimed author of Beneath a Marble Sky and Beside a Burning Sea—the new novel from “a master storyteller” (Amy Tan) set in contemporary Asia.

Dragon House tells the tale of Iris and Noah—two Americans who, as a way of healing their own painful pasts, open a center to house and educate Vietnamese street children. In the slums of a city that has known little but war for generations, Iris and Noah befriend children who dream of nothing more than of going to school,

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From the critically acclaimed author of Beneath a Marble Sky and Beside a Burning Sea—the new novel from “a master storyteller” (Amy Tan) set in contemporary Asia.

Dragon House tells the tale of Iris and Noah—two Americans who, as a way of healing their own painful pasts, open a center to house and educate Vietnamese street children. In the slums of a city that has known little but war for generations, Iris and Noah befriend children who dream of nothing more than of going to school, having a home, and being loved. Learning from the poorest of the poor, the most silent of the unheard, Iris and Noah find themselves reborn. Resounding with powerful themes of suffering, sacrifice, friendship, and love, Dragon House brings together East and West, war and peace, and celebrates the resilience of the human spirit.

A portion of the proceeds from this book’s sales will be donated to the Blue Dragon Children’s Foundation. To learn more, visit www.bdcf.org.

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About John Shors

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Praise

John Shors traveled extensively throughout Asia after graduating from Colorado College in 1991. He now divides his time between writing and spending time with his wife and two young children.

Discussion Questions

“In a large cast of appealing characters, the street children are the heart of this book; their talents, friendships, and perils keep you turning the pages.”
Karen Joy Fowler, New York Times bestselling author of The Jane Austen Book Club

“All of his characters—hustlers, humanitarians, street children—carry wounds, visible or otherwise. And in the cacophony of their voices, he asks that most essential question: ‘How can we be better?'” —David Oliver Relin, co-author of Three Cups of Tea