FOR ONE MORE DAY

Mitch Albom

Mitch Albom mesmerized readers around the world with his number one New York Times bestsellers, The Five People You Meet in Heaven and Tuesdays with Morrie. Now he returns with a beautiful, haunting novel about the family we love and the chances we miss.

Charley “Chick” Benetto has reached the end of his rope. Raised by his absent father to play baseball, Chick made it to the big time—the World Series—but injury cut his major league career tragically short. Since then it’s been all downhill, and the slide became a plummet when he lied to his mother and his own family to get one last shot at glory,

more …

Mitch Albom mesmerized readers around the world with his number one New York Times bestsellers, The Five People You Meet in Heaven and Tuesdays with Morrie. Now he returns with a beautiful, haunting novel about the family we love and the chances we miss.

Charley “Chick” Benetto has reached the end of his rope. Raised by his absent father to play baseball, Chick made it to the big time—the World Series—but injury cut his major league career tragically short. Since then it’s been all downhill, and the slide became a plummet when he lied to his mother and his own family to get one last shot at glory, with disastrous results. Suicide comes to seem like his best choice, so Chick returns to his childhood home to put an end to his unhappiness. But what he finds there changes everything…

For anybody who’s ever wanted one more day with a departed loved one, anyone who’s had regrets over how they treated – or were treated by – their parents, anyone who’s ever wondered if their life could be different if things were only fixed, For One More Day will bring satisfaction, joy and undeniable insight.

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  • Hyperion
  • Paperback
  • April 2008
  • 208 Pages
  • 9781401309572

Buy the Book

$12.00

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  • Hyperion
  • Hardcover
  • September 2006
  • 208 Pages
  • 9781401303273

Buy the Book

$21.95

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About Mitch Albom

Mitch Albom is the author of the #1 international bestsellers Tuesdays With Morrie and The Five People You Meet In Heaven. Both books were made into highly-acclaimed TV movies. Albom is also a playwright and screenwriter and has received more than 100 awards for his work as a journalist and broadcaster. He is the founder of three charities: S.A.Y. Detroit, which helps the homeless; The Dream Fund, which gives underprivileged youth the chance to study the arts; and A Time To Help, a monthly volunteer program. He lives with his wife in Michigan.

Praise

“If you had the chance, just one chance, to go back and fix what you did wrong in life, would you take it? And if you did, would you be big enough to stand it? Mitch Albom, in this new book, once again demonstrates why he is one of my favorite writers: a fearless explorer of the wishful and magical, he is also a devout believer in the power of love. For One More Day will make you smile. It will make you wistful. It will make you blink back tears of nostalgia. But most of all, it will make you believe in the eternal power of a mother’s love.” –James McBride, author of The Color of Water

Discussion Questions

In the first paragraph of the novel, and repeated several times throughout the book, is the line “every family is a ghost story.” What do you think that means? Who is the real ghost in the Benetto family?

Which scene resonated with you the most, and why?

Re-read the “Beginning” section. Now that you know the identity of the narrator, how does your understanding of the section change? Did the narrator’s identity surprise you? Why, or why not?

Discuss the last paragraph of the “Beginning” section, on page 4: “Have you ever lost someone you love and wanted one more conversation, one more chance to make up for the time when you thought they would be here forever? If so, then you know you can go through your whole life collecting days, and none will outweigh the one you wish you had back. What if you got it back?” What did you imagine this meant when you first read it? What does it mean to you now? Is there someone in your own life with whom you’d like to spend one more day?

Why do you think Chick tried to commit suicide? Was it for the reasons he stated, or was there something else behind it?

On page 7, Chick says “Mothers support certain illusions about their children.” What did he mean by that statement? What about fathers?

Consider the passage on page 10 in which Chick talks about missing his daughter’s wedding. Given the identity of the book’s narrator, what do you think is happening here? Is it manipulation, guilt, hubris, or something else entirely?

Several times in the novel, Chick says that you can either be a mama’s boy or a daddy’s boy, but not both. Which was Chick? Which did he believe himself to be? Do you agree that you can only be one or the other?

On page 36, Chick says, “kids chase the love that eludes them.” How does this play out over the course of the novel? Whose love does he chase, ultimately, and why?

Chick believes strongly in the power of words: “divorcee” (page 70), “Mom” (page 160), “She died” (page 187). What makes these words so powerful? Is it the context of the story, or are they freighted in real life, too?

Throughout the novel, Chick outlines various times when he failed to stand up for his mother, and was often quite cold to her. Is there a special cruelty that children inflict on their parents? Is Chick cruel to other characters?

Novels about mother-son relationships are relatively rare. Can you think of any others you’ve read and enjoyed? How did their portrayals compare to For One More Day?

On page 151, a mountain climber tells Chick that descending is much more difficult than ascending: “The backside of a mountain is a fight against human nature. You have to care as much about yourself on the way down as you did on the way up.” Do you agree with this statement? Where were Chick’s ascents and descents? How did he deal with them?

Discuss the significance of the Old Timers’ Game—its timing, Chick’s deception, his father’s involvement. How is it a turning point?

Chick learns a shocking secret about his father’s life on page 192. How does it change his understanding of his parents’ relationship? How does it change your understanding of Posey, Leonard, and Chick as characters?