IF YOU COULD SEE ME NOW

Cecelia Ahern

In her third novel, bestselling author Cecelia Ahern introduces us to two sisters at odds with each other. Elizabeth’s life is an organized mess. The organized part is all due to her own efforts. The mess is entirely due to her sister, Saoirse, whose personal problems leave Elizabeth scrambling to pick up the pieces. One of these pieces is Saoirse’s six-year-old son, Luke. Luke is quiet and contemplative, until the arrival of a new friend, Ivan, turns him into an outgoing, lively kid. And Elizabeth’s life is about to change in wonderful ways she has only dreamed of.

With all the warmth and wit that fans have come to expect from Cecelia Ahern,

more …

In her third novel, bestselling author Cecelia Ahern introduces us to two sisters at odds with each other. Elizabeth’s life is an organized mess. The organized part is all due to her own efforts. The mess is entirely due to her sister, Saoirse, whose personal problems leave Elizabeth scrambling to pick up the pieces. One of these pieces is Saoirse’s six-year-old son, Luke. Luke is quiet and contemplative, until the arrival of a new friend, Ivan, turns him into an outgoing, lively kid. And Elizabeth’s life is about to change in wonderful ways she has only dreamed of.

With all the warmth and wit that fans have come to expect from Cecelia Ahern, this is a novel full of magic, heart, and surprising romance.

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  • Hyperion Books
  • Paperback
  • January 2007
  • 319 Pages
  • 9781401308667

Buy the Book

$22.95

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About Cecelia Ahern

Cecelia Ahern, the 23-year-old daughter of Ireland’s prime minister, holds a degree in Journalism and Media Communications. The author of PS, I Love You and Love, Rosie, she lives in Dublin, Ireland.

Praise

Praise for Cecelia Ahern’s previous novel PS, I Love You: “Sweet and sad and funny: a charming journey of grief and hope.” —Marian Keyes, author of Sushi for Beginners

Discussion Questions

Who was Ivan sent to befriend—Elizabeth or Luke? Who’s life does he change more?

Did you have an imaginary friend? How did he change your outlook on life?

At the end of the book, Elizabeth finally confronts her childhood. How does that change how she thinks about life? How did her childhood memory align with what really happens? How can memory cloud your reality?