LIPSTICK JUNGLE

Candace Bushnell

Victory Ford is the darling of the fashion world. Single, attractive, and iconoclastic, she has worked for years to create her own signature line. As well as learning crucial lessons about what she really wants in a relationship.

Nico O’Neilly is the glamorous, brilliant editor of Bonfire Magazine— the pop-culture bible for fashion, show business, and politics. Considered one of the most powerful women in publishing, she seems to have it all. But in a mid-life crisis, she suddenly realizes this isn’t enough.

Wendy Healy’s chutzpah has propelled her to the very top of the cut­throat movie industry.

more …

Victory Ford is the darling of the fashion world. Single, attractive, and iconoclastic, she has worked for years to create her own signature line. As well as learning crucial lessons about what she really wants in a relationship.

Nico O’Neilly is the glamorous, brilliant editor of Bonfire Magazine— the pop-culture bible for fashion, show business, and politics. Considered one of the most powerful women in publishing, she seems to have it all. But in a mid-life crisis, she suddenly realizes this isn’t enough.

Wendy Healy’s chutzpah has propelled her to the very top of the cut­throat movie industry. When it becomes clear that a competitor is trying to oust her, something has to give—and Wendy must decide between her career and her marriage.

In Lipstick Jungle, Bushnell once again delivers an addictive page-turner of sex and scandal that will keep readers enthralled and guessing to the very last page.

 

less …
  • Hyperion Books
  • Paperback
  • August 2006
  • 480 Pages
  • 9780786887071

Buy the Book

$5.98

indies Bookstore indies Bookstore

About Candace Bushnell

Candace Bushnell is the author of three bestsellers, Sex and the City, Four Blondes, and Trading Up. She has been a columnist for the New York Observer and a contributing editor to Vogue. She lives in New York City.

Praise

“Bushnell’s emphasis on female friendship and career ambition may . . . win her a legion of new readers. Her characters want ‘the sweet, creamy sensation of power,’ and it’s Bushnell’s account of how they got it, and how they keep it, that will really keep readers turning pages.” —Publishers Weekly

Discussion Questions

Much of Bushnell’s previous work is about a woman’s quest to find and keep a man. But Lipstick Jungle focuses instead on the quest for power and success. What do you think of this decision? Does this book send a new type of message? What is it?

If you could have the life of Victory, Wendy, or Nico, which would you choose? Do you admire one of these characters more than the others? Why?

Would you ever consider Candace Bushnell a feminist? Why or why not?

What role does marriage play in the lives of these women? Does it help or hurt them? Or both?

What do you think about the men in this book? Are they characters or caricatures?