9780312380731

LOOK AGAIN

Lisa Scottoline

When reporter Ellen Gleeson gets a “Have You Seen This Child?” flyer in the mail, she almost throws it away. But something about it makes her look again, and her heart stops—the child in the photo is identical to her adopted son, Will. Her every instinct tells her to deny the similarity between the boys, because she knows her adoption was lawful. But she’s a journalist and won’t be able to stop thinking about the photo until she figures out the truth.

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When reporter Ellen Gleeson gets a “Have You Seen This Child?” flyer in the mail, she almost throws it away. But something about it makes her look again, and her heart stops—the child in the photo is identical to her adopted son, Will. Her every instinct tells her to deny the similarity between the boys, because she knows her adoption was lawful. But she’s a journalist and won’t be able to stop thinking about the photo until she figures out the truth. And she can’t shake the question: if Will rightfully belongs to someone else, should she keep him or give him up? She investigates, uncovering clues no one was meant to discover, and when she digs too deep, she risks losing her own life—and that of the son she loves.

 

Lisa Scottoline breaks new ground in Look Again, a thriller that’s both heart-stopping and heart-breaking, and sure to have new fans and book clubs buzzing.

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Paperback

Price: $13.99

ISBN: 9780312380731

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About Lisa Scottoline

Lisa Scottoline is the New York Times bestselling author of 15 novels including Lady Killer and Daddy’s Girl. She also writes a weekly column titled, Chick Wit, for the Philadelphia Inquirer. She won an Edgar® Award and Cosmopolitan magazine’s “Fun Fearless Fiction” Award. She lives in the Philadelphia area.

Praise

“As skillful as Scottoline’s thriller is, it is enhanced by Mary Stuart Masterson’s performance. Her characterizations are distinct and evocative, her tone remains smooth, even while ratcheting up the tension and suspense. Listeners will be wholly absorbed by this moving story.”—Publishers Weekly

“Narrated by actress Mary Stuart Masterson, Look Again is a suspenseful story that tugs at the heart, as listeners follow Ellen’s determined search to uncover Will’s mysterious history, raising questions of where he belongs—and who he belongs to.”
Kirkus Reviews

“Not many audios make you drive out of your way just to keep the disks turning. This is one: suspenseful, believable, thought-provoking and, yes, thrilling.”—The Dallas Morning News

Discussion Questions

LOOK AGAIN really examines the notion of parenthood. What do you think makes someone a parent? Do you think the bond a child has with a non-biological parent can be as strong as one they would have with a biological parent? Why?

Lisa’s favorite quote is one from Eleanor Roosevelt, “A woman is like a tea bag. You never know how strong she is until she’s in hot water.” How does Ellen prove that she is a strong woman? Does Ellen remind you of anyone you know? Could you relate to Ellen, and did you like her? Why or why not?

As a journalist, Ellen has a heightened need to find the truth. In this circumstance, was this a good thing, or a bad thing? What would you have done in Ellen’s place? Would you have looked for the truth, even if it meant losing your son? What do you think were Ellen’s motivations?

The idea of “letting go” a child helped shape the whole premise of the book for Lisa, which led her to thinking about who really “owns” a child. Who do you think “owns” a child, and what exactly does that mean? If children actually “own” themselves, what then is the role of parents, and what are the limitations on parenthood?

If the child you raised and loved with all your heart actually belonged to someone else, and you were the only one who knew, would you give the child up? How do you think those around you would react? Who in your life would agree with your decision, and who would have done the opposite?

How would you describe Ellen’s relationship with her father and how do you think it changed over the course of the book? Ellen considered her mother her go to parent. Do you think everyone has a go to parent, and what defines them as such?

What effect do you think all the drama in Will’s life will have on him in the future? Do you think things ultimately worked out to his benefit or detriment and why?

How do you feel about single parents adopting children? What kind of, if any, additional requirements do you think should be put on single parents before they can adopt? How do you feel about open adoption? Is it better or worse for children? Is it better or worse for the adoptive parents? The biological parents? At what age do you think a child should be told they are adopted?