MRS. DALLOWAY’S PARTY

Virginia Woolf

The landmark modern novel Mrs. Dalloway creates a portrait of a single day in the life of Clarissa Dalloway as she orchestrates the last-minute details of a grand party. But before Virginia Woolf wrote this masterwork, she explored in a series of fascinating stories a similar revelry in the mental and physical excitement of a party. Wonderfully captivating, the seven stories in Mrs. Dalloway’s Party create a dynamic and delightful portrait of what Woolf called “party consciousness.” As parallel expressions of the themes of Mrs. Dalloway, these stories provide a valuable window into Woolf’s writing mind and a further testament to her extraordinary genius.

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The landmark modern novel Mrs. Dalloway creates a portrait of a single day in the life of Clarissa Dalloway as she orchestrates the last-minute details of a grand party. But before Virginia Woolf wrote this masterwork, she explored in a series of fascinating stories a similar revelry in the mental and physical excitement of a party. Wonderfully captivating, the seven stories in Mrs. Dalloway’s Party create a dynamic and delightful portrait of what Woolf called “party consciousness.” As parallel expressions of the themes of Mrs. Dalloway, these stories provide a valuable window into Woolf’s writing mind and a further testament to her extraordinary genius.

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  • Mariner Books
  • Paperback
  • January 2004
  • 228 Pages
  • 9780156029322

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About Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), one of the major literary figures of the twentieth century, transformed the art of the novel with groundbreaking works such as Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse. The author of numerous collections of letters, journals, and short stories, she was an admired literary critic and a master of the essay form. Women and Writing was first published in 1942.

Praise

“With Mrs. Dalloway Virginia Woolf insisted that a life of errands and party-giving was every bit as viable a subject as any life lived anywhere; and that should any human act in any novel seem unimportant, it has merely been inadequately observed. The novel as an art form has not been the same since.”—Michael Cunningham, author of The Hours