PIE TOWN

Lynn Hinton

Pie Town, New Mexico, was once legendary for its extraordinary pies. But it’s been a while since these delectable desserts graced the counter at the local diner. The townspeople—a hearty mix of Anglos, Hispanics, and Native Americans—like to think of themselves as family, especially when it comes to caring for Alex, a disabled little boy being raised by his grandparents. But, unforeseen by all, Pie Town’s fortunes are about to take a major turn—due to the arrival of a new priest, Father George Morris, who seems woefully unprepared for his first assignment, and the young hitchhiker Trina, who some townsfolk just know is trouble.

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Pie Town, New Mexico, was once legendary for its extraordinary pies. But it’s been a while since these delectable desserts graced the counter at the local diner. The townspeople—a hearty mix of Anglos, Hispanics, and Native Americans—like to think of themselves as family, especially when it comes to caring for Alex, a disabled little boy being raised by his grandparents. But, unforeseen by all, Pie Town’s fortunes are about to take a major turn—due to the arrival of a new priest, Father George Morris, who seems woefully unprepared for his first assignment, and the young hitchhiker Trina, who some townsfolk just know is trouble. . . .

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  • William Morrow Paperbacks
  • Paperback
  • June 2011
  • 352 Pages
  • 9780062045089

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About Lynn Hinton

Lynne Hinton,a retreat leader and writing teacher, is the author of numerous novels, including Wedding Cake, Christmas Cake, Friendship Cake, Hope Springs, and Forever Friends. She also writes a mystery series under the name Jackie Lynn. She lives in New Mexico.

Praise

“Lynne Hinton deftly pens an uplifting tale of hope, faith, and community.”—Lori Wilde, New York Times bestselling author of The Welcome Home Garden Club

“Hinton’s writing style is similar to Eudora Welty’s: easy, conversational, down-home.”—Greensboro News & Record

“[A] feel-good story—one that will be enjoyed by readers of Jan Karon and Nicholas Sparks.”—Booklist on Pie Town

Discussion Questions

New Mexico is often described as three cultures living together:Native American, Hispanic, and Caucasian. Which characters in the book represent these three cultures, and how?

 

Pie Town is a very small town. What are the advantages to living in a small town? What are the disadvantages?

 

What is the role of the angel, Alice, in this story? Who needs the angel most in Pie Town? Is it Alex or someone else?

 

How would you describe Father George? Were you surprised by his secret?

 

At what point in the story did you think Trina might be pregnant? Do you think she was treated fairly after people found out? Where do you think an unmarried and pregnant girl would get the most support, in a small town or in a more urban setting?

 

Despite its name, there are no pies in Pie Town. What significance does this have in the story? Do you think there will ever be pies in Pie Town?

 

How does Pie Town illustrate the idea of “community”? How do you define community?

 

What ultimately motivates the townspeople to help Father George rebuild the church? What does the church symbolize to the town? Why did Alex think it was so important for Pie Town to rebuild Holy Family Church?

 

Why does Alex never seem to be mad at his mother for leaving? Do you think children forgive more easily than adults? Why or why not?

 

Do you prefer cake or pie? What’s your favorite kind of pie?