THE BOY WHO WENT AWAY

Eli Gottlieb

Denny Graubart, child-narrator and “domestic surveillance expert,” is having some terrible suspicions about his mother and autistic brother. It’s the Diagnostic Dark Ages of Autism, and while his mother struggles to keep his brother out of an institution, signs of something more disturbing are beginning to emerge before young Denny’s eyes. Battered by his own tragicomic sexual awakening during a long, hot summer, Denny will eventually find his most horrified suspicions about his family confirmed. A powerfully drawn portrait of two brothers locked into an asymmetrical childhood and a family struggling against a weight of medical ignorance, The Boy Who Went Away is “shockingly,

more …

Denny Graubart, child-narrator and “domestic surveillance expert,” is having some terrible suspicions about his mother and autistic brother. It’s the Diagnostic Dark Ages of Autism, and while his mother struggles to keep his brother out of an institution, signs of something more disturbing are beginning to emerge before young Denny’s eyes. Battered by his own tragicomic sexual awakening during a long, hot summer, Denny will eventually find his most horrified suspicions about his family confirmed. A powerfully drawn portrait of two brothers locked into an asymmetrical childhood and a family struggling against a weight of medical ignorance, The Boy Who Went Away is “shockingly, electrically alive” (Phillip Lopate). It is also an indispensable bookend to Gottlieb’s Best Boy, which recounts the impact of autism on the same family from the other side, many years later, in the voice of a middle-aged autistic man. 

less …
  • Liveright Publishing
  • Paperback
  • September 2015
  • 256 Pages
  • 9781631490927

Buy the Book

$14.95

indies Bookstore indies Bookstore

About Eli Gottlieb

Eli Gottlieb is the author of Best Boy, among other novels. His works have been translated into a dozen languages. He lives in New York City.

Praise

Beautiful for its compassion and insights.” —Oscar Hijuelos, author of The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love, winner of the Pulitzer Prize

Scalding and hilarious. . . . A haunting book, beautifully written.” —Lucy Grealy, author of Autobiography of a Face

“With a cool, unflinching gaze reminiscent of Updike . . . Gottlieb presents a moving portrait.” —Observer