THE CRIME WRITER

Gregg Hurwitz

A crime writer finds himself entangled in his own gruesome mystery in this fast-paced psychological thriller.

Drew Danner, a crime novelist with a house off L.A.’s storied Mulholland Drive, awakens in a hospital bed with a scar on his head and no memory of being found convulsing over his ex- fiancee’s body the previous night. He was discovered holding a knife, her blood beneath his nails. He himself doesn’t know whether he’s guilty or innocent. To reconstruct the story, the writer must now become the protagonist, searching the corridors of his life and the city he loves.

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A crime writer finds himself entangled in his own gruesome mystery in this fast-paced psychological thriller.

Drew Danner, a crime novelist with a house off L.A.’s storied Mulholland Drive, awakens in a hospital bed with a scar on his head and no memory of being found convulsing over his ex- fiancee’s body the previous night. He was discovered holding a knife, her blood beneath his nails. He himself doesn’t know whether he’s guilty or innocent. To reconstruct the story, the writer must now become the protagonist, searching the corridors of his life and the city he loves.

Soon Drew closes in on clues he may or may not have left for himself, and as another young woman is similarly murdered he has to ask difficult questions not of others but of himself. Beautifully crafted and heartbreakingly told, The Crime Writer confronts our inherent fear of what we might truly be capable of—good or evil. Like nothing he’s written before, The Crime Writer takes Hurwitz in an exciting new direction and is sure to reach a whole new audience.

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  • Viking
  • Hardcover
  • July 2007
  • 320 Pages
  • 9780670063215

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$24.95

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About Gregg Hurwitz

Gregg Hurwitz is the critically acclaimed bestselling author of The Tower, Minutes to Burn, Do No Harm, The Kill Clause, The Program, Troubleshooter, and most recently, Last Shot. He has taught fiction writing in the USC English Department and at the La Jolla Writer’s Conference. He lives in Los Angeles

Praise

“With The Crime Writer, Gregg Hurwitz has taken a quantum leap forward in the realm of American suspense literature. A thrilling, mind-bending journey, it is also deeply humane and beautifully written. You’ll turn the final page with profound regret.” —Dennis Lehane

“It would be so simple to say that The Crime Writer toys and pokes and jabs with the genre. And of course it does. But by merging author and hero, Hurwitz sharpens a brand-new edge in his voice. An elegant, engaging and wonderfully human book.” —Brad Meltzer

The Crime Writer is the must read crime novel of the year. Brilliantly rendered with hip intelligence and fierce originality, this book is a stunner. Gregg Hurwitz may well have created a brand name franchise and deservedly so.” —Robert Crais

“Outstanding in every way. Hurwitz’s previous books – great as they were – look like practice swings before this titanic blast.” —Lee Child

Discussion Questions

Do you think it’s possible for someone to commit murder and not remember it?

Drew admitted that he knew about the tumor months before the night Genevieve died and was warned he could have a seizure while driving his car, thus endangering innocent lives. How much is Drew responsible for what happened subsequently?

Discuss the role that Drew’s celebrity played in his trial and what happened afterward. In what ways did it help or hinder him?

Drew is helped by his connections in law enforcement—Cal Unger, Lloyd Wagner. Do you believe it’s ethical for the police to consult on fictional crimes that may inspire actual criminals?

Sitting at home on his deck, Drew takes an imaginary tour of the city he both loves and hates. In what ways could this story happen only in LA?

Katherine Harriman, the prosecuting attorney in Drew’s case, tells him, “You can never arrive at the truth. . . . The facts are only the raw material, not the finished product.” Do you agree or disagree? Why?

After Kasey Broach’s death, Detectives Kaden and Delvechio tell Drew that they’re not even looking for another suspect because they know he’s guilty. Do you think this is a reasonable conclusion for two police detectives to draw? Why or why not?

When Drew disapproves of Junior Delgado’s tagging, he retorts, “What would you do if your art was illegal? Stop doin’ it?” Do you feel that Junior should stop painting graffiti just because the law tells him it’s wrong?

Drew’s relationship with Genevieve ended because she was too emotionally damaged. Do you think he would have been attracted to a woman like Caroline before the trial? How have his experiences changed him?