One of our recommended books is Firekeeper's Daughter by Angelline Boulley

FIREKEEPER’S DAUGHTER


Keep their secrets. Live their lies. Earn your truth.

Angela Boulley’s Firekeeper’s Daughter is a groundbreaking YA thriller about a Native teen who goes undercover to root out the crime and corruption threatening her community.

Eighteen-year-old Daunis Fontaine wants to leave home to discover who she really is. As a biracial science geek and hockey star, she’s always felt like an outsider, both in her hometown and on the nearby Ojibwe reservation. But when her family is struck by tragedy, Daunis puts her dreams on hold to care for her fragile mother.

more …

Keep their secrets. Live their lies. Earn your truth.

Angela Boulley’s Firekeeper’s Daughter is a groundbreaking YA thriller about a Native teen who goes undercover to root out the crime and corruption threatening her community.

Eighteen-year-old Daunis Fontaine wants to leave home to discover who she really is. As a biracial science geek and hockey star, she’s always felt like an outsider, both in her hometown and on the nearby Ojibwe reservation. But when her family is struck by tragedy, Daunis puts her dreams on hold to care for her fragile mother. The only bright spot is meeting Jamie, the charming new recruit on her brother’s hockey team.

Then Daunis witnesses a shocking murder, thrusting her into the heart of an ongoing FBI investigation. As an undercover informant, Daunis works tirelessly to expose the criminals. But as the secrets pile up and the deception strikes close to home, Daunis must learn what it means to be a strong Anishinaabe kwe (Ojibwe woman).

less …
  • Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
  • Hardcover
  • March 2021
  • 320 Pages
  • 9781250766564

Buy the Book

$18.99

indies Bookstore indies Bookstore

About Angelline Boulley

Angeline Boulley, an enrolled member of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, is a storyteller who writes about her Ojibwe community in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. She was selected as an emerging Young Adult writer in the 2019 We Need Diverse Books Mentorship Program and chosen to attend the 2019 Tin House YA Writers Workshop. As a former Director of the Office of Indian Education at the U.S. Department of Education, she focused on improving the education of Native American students at the tribal, state, regional, and national levels. She lives and works in the Washington, D.C. area, but her home will always be on Sugar Island. Firekeeper’s Daughter is her debut novel.

Author Website

Discussion Questions

1. Daunis starts every day with a prayer and a morning run. What is the significance of ritual to Daunis? What other rituals does she engage in?

2. Daunis talks about keeping her various “worlds” separate, saying, “My life goes more smoothly when Hockey World and Real World don’t overlap. Same as with my Fontaine and Firekeeper worlds.” What are ways in which we see Daunis acting to keep her worlds separate? Do you think she feels a stronger connection to one world or the other? Do you agree it’s easier to keep worlds separate?

3. Daunis often seeks wisdom and guidance from the Elders. How does the role of the Elders compare to the role of senior citizens in your community?

4. Both Daunis and Jamie struggle with their identities—while Daunis feels torn between many, Jamie doesn’t have any sense of where he comes from. Are there similarities in the way they consider their identities? Differences?

5. Aunt Teddie describes a Blanket Party as “Nish Kwe justice.” What do you think of this form of justice and how Blanket Parties were created? How do you think this might influence Daunis’s understanding of justice?

6. Teddie tells Daunis, “Not every Elder is a cultural teacher and not all cultural teachers are Elders. It’s okay to listen to what people say and only hold onto the parts that resonate with you. It’s okay to leave the rest behind. Trust yourself to know the difference.” What does Teddie mean? What does Daunis choose to hold onto and leave behind from her culture?

7. Describe Daunis’s feelings after she learns that her testimony can’t be used in the court. Why do you believe the author made this choice?

8. Why did the author choose to end the story on a powwow scene? How does this speak to the themes of the book?

9. Daunis references the Seven Grandfather teachings throughout the novel—Love, Humility, Respect, Honesty, Bravery, Wisdom, and Truth. Are there characters or moments that help Daunis learn and embody these teachings?