BELIEVE ME

Nina Killham

 In the tradition of Jodi Picoult—a fresh, smart, and deeply moving novel about the power of faith, love, and family

Thirteen-year-old Nic Delano has a lot of questions. Like why does he have a babysitter at his age-and where did she get such long legs? But mostly, what exactly is the meaning of life?

His mother, Lucy, an astrophysicist and atheist, has always encouraged Nic to ask questions. But lately she doesn’t like the answers he’s getting. Nic has been hanging out with a group of devout Christians and is starting to embrace the Bible—and a very different view of the heavens.

more …

 In the tradition of Jodi Picoult—a fresh, smart, and deeply moving novel about the power of faith, love, and family

Thirteen-year-old Nic Delano has a lot of questions. Like why does he have a babysitter at his age-and where did she get such long legs? But mostly, what exactly is the meaning of life?

His mother, Lucy, an astrophysicist and atheist, has always encouraged Nic to ask questions. But lately she doesn’t like the answers he’s getting. Nic has been hanging out with a group of devout Christians and is starting to embrace the Bible—and a very different view of the heavens.

But when unexpected tragedy strikes, Nic and Lucy’s beliefs are truly to put to the test. And they need each other now more than ever. But will a mother and her son be able to find a common ground where faith meets understanding and love is, ultimately, what endures?

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  • Plume Books
  • Paperback
  • February 2009
  • 294 Pages
  • 9780452289765

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$15.00

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About Nina Killham

 Nina Killman is also the author of How to Cook a Tart, and Mounting Desire. She is married to an Australian who is a senior lecturer at the London School of Economics. They live in London, have two young children and like to bicker about the meaning of life.

Praise

“A story of the irrefutable power of things unseen . . . I was stunned at this novel’s assurance.”
Jacqueline Mitchard, author of The Deep End of the Ocean

“Nina Killham is wickedly intelligent [and] her writing is succulent and true.” —Jennifer Crusie, author of Getting Rid of Bradley

Discussion Questions

Why do you think Lucy feels the way she does about religion?

How could you describe Lucy and Nic’s relationship? How much control should a parent have over what their child believes?

How much do you know about astronomy and the celestial neighborhood we live in?

In your opinion, should Lucy have moved down to Williamsburg to keep the family together even if it meant leaving her hard-earned job?

Is Mrs. Porter a benevolent figure in Nic’s life? Did she help or hinder his search for truth?

Will Nic’s search for truth change as he grows older? Can truth be different for different times of one’s life? Is the search for truth an end in itself?

How difficult is it to believe in what you believe without being influenced or even threatened by others.

How fraught are the middle school years? Does our society make room for questioning children?

Is Dele a benevolent figure? What do you think he will do when he returns to Africa?

If Nigel and Pastor Stowe sat down to dinner together would they find any common ground?

Why is it so difficult to express our love for each other. Is religion a way of expressing love for each other?