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THE BEST OF ADAM SHARP

Two decades ago, Adam Sharp’s piano playing led him into a passionate relationship with Angelina Brown, an intelligent and strong-willed actress. They had a chance at something more—but Adam didn’t take it.

Now, on the cusp of turning fifty, Adam likes his life. He’s happy with his partner Claire, he excels in music trivia at quiz night at the local pub, he looks after his mother, and he does the occasional consulting job in IT. But he can never quite shake off his nostalgia for what might have been.

And then, out of nowhere, from the other side of the world,

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THE INFAMOUS HARRY HAYWARD

A fascinating tale of seduction, murder, fraud, coercion—and the trial of the “Minneapolis Monster”

On a winter night in 1894, a young woman’s body was found in the middle of a road near Lake Calhoun on the outskirts of Minneapolis. She had been shot through the head. The murder of Kittie Ging, a twenty-nine-year-old dressmaker, was the final act in a melodrama of seduction and betrayal, petty crimes and monstrous deeds that would obsess reporters and their readers across the nation when the man who likely arranged her killing came to trial the following spring.

Shawn Francis Peters unravels that sordid,

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SONS AND SOLDIERS

They were young Jewish boys who escaped from Nazi-occupied Europe and resettled in America. After the United States entered the war, they returned to fight for their adopted homeland and for the families they had left behind. Their stories tell the tale of one of the U.S. Army’s greatest secret weapons.

Sons and Soldiers begins during the menacing rise of Hitler’s Nazi party, as Jewish families were trying desperately to get out of Europe. Bestselling author Bruce Henderson captures the heartbreaking stories of parents choosing to send their young sons away to uncertain futures in America,

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A CARNIVAL OF LOSSES

New essays from the vantage point of very old age, once again “alternately lyrical and laugh-out-loud funny,” (New York Times) from the former poet laureate of the United States 

Donald Hall has lived a remarkable life of letters, one capped most recently by the New York Times bestseller Essays After Eighty, a “treasure” of a book in which he “balance[s] frankness about losses with humor and gratitude” (Washington Post). Now nearing ninety, Hall delivers a new collection of self-knowing, fierce, and funny essays on aging,

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EDINBURGH

As a child, Fee is a gifted Korean-American soprano in a boys’ choir in Maine. Silent after being abused by the director, he is unable to warn the other boys or protect his best friend, Peter, from the director’s advances. Even after the director is imprisoned, Fee continues to believe he is responsible, and while he survives to adulthood, his friends do not. In the years that follow, he struggles to bury his guilt and grief, until he meets a beautiful young student that resembles Peter, and he is forced to confront the demons of his brutal past.

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ONE DAY YOU’LL THANK ME

Fatherhood caught David McGlynn by surprise. His sons arrived in quick succession—the first when the author was a dirt-poor student and the second not long after he’d moved his family across the country to start a new job in bucolic Wisconsin. As a result, McGlynn found himself colliding with fatherhood, at once scared to death and utterly thrilled. Just like many new fathers, he hopes he’s doing the right thing—but he’s never quite sure.

One Day You’ll Thank Me translates the small, often hilarious moments common among parents of young children, especially dads, into “life lessons” about fatherhood.

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